Courses

College Required Courses:

 

PHY 100 Physics I: Statics

This course is worth 3 credit hours and can be considered as a specified and advanced mechanics course oriented toward an engineering major. Rigid-body mechanics is divided into two areas: statics and dynamics. Statics deals with the equilibrium of bodies, that is, those that are either at rest or move with a constant velocity, whereas dynamics is concerned with the accelerated motion of bodies. We can consider statics as a special case of dynamics, in which the acceleration is zero; however, statics deserves separate treatment in engineering education since many objects are designed with the intention that they remain in equilibrium. Thus, this course is designed so that it enhances engineering students’ understanding of statics and how it is applied in an engineering framework.

The main topics in the class are: vector operations, force vectors, equilibrium of a particle, equilibrium of a rigid body, structural analysis, internal forces, friction, center of gravity and centroid, moments of inertia, and virtual work.

MAT 210 Calculus III – Multiple Integrals and Fourier Series

This course requires a basic knowledge of Calculus 1 and 2. Calculus 3 deals with multivariate calculus or multi-dimensional analysis vis-à-vis the one dimensional analysis in both Calculus 1 and 2. Topics include analytic geometry in space, partial differentiation and application, vectors in space, double and triple integrals, and integral vector calculus.

PHY200 Physics II: Calculus-Based Physics

This course is worth 3 credit hours and can be considered as a specified and advanced mechanics course oriented toward an engineering major. Rigid-body mechanics is divided into two areas: statics and dynamics. Statics deals with the equilibrium of bodies, that is, those that are either at rest or move with a constant velocity, whereas dynamics is concerned with the accelerated motion of bodies. We can consider statics as a special case of dynamics, in which the acceleration is zero. In this course students will be introduced to both kinematics and kinetics of accelerated objects (particles and rigid bodies) using calculus. The course is designed so that it enhances engineering students’ understanding of dynamics and how it is applied within engineering framework.

The main topics in the class are kinematics of a particle; kinetics of a particle: force, acceleration, work, energy, impulse and momentum; planar kinematics of a rigid body; planar kinetics of a rigid body: force, acceleration, work, energy, impulse and momentum; three dimensional kinematics and kinetics of a rigid body.

MAT220 Linear Algebra for Engineers

This course includes algebraic expressions, linear, absolute value equations and inequalities, lines, systems of linear equations, polynomials, and factoring.

MAT310 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (Prerequisite for this course is MAT160)

This course is worth 3 credit hours and satisfies the core mathematics requirement. This course includes ordinary differentiations of one variable including First-Order ordinary differential equation (ODE), Second-Order ODE, Higher Order ODE, Series Solutions of ODEs, and Laplace Transformations.

MEG201 Mechanics of Materials (Prerequisites for this course are MAT160 and PHY100)

This course satisfies the 3 credit hours of Specialization requirement. In this course, the student is introduced to mechanics of materials needed as a foundation for the advanced engineering courses. This class is an overview of mechanical properties of metals, polymer, and wood, emphasizing the role of processing and microstructure in controlling these properties. Basic topics in mechanics of materials including stress and strain, axial load, torsion of a circular shaft, beam bending, and stress transformations.

Department Core Courses:

 

1. Department of Electronics and Telecommunications Engineering:

ETE120 Digital technologies

Digital technology is a foundation course for computer programming and web/digital communication courses. This course describes number systems, arithmetic operations, decimal codes, alphanumeric codes, Boolean algebra, Karnaugh maps, NAND and NOR gates, exclusive-OR gates, integrated circuits, combinational circuits, decoders, encoders, multiplexers, adders, subtractors, multipliers, sequential circuits, latches, flip-flops, sequential circuits analysis, registers, counters, RAM and ROM memories, programmable logic technologies (PLA, PLD, CPLD, FPGA).

IT309 Mobile Technologies

This course describes Mobile Technology networks by giving an overview of the very early stages of deploying mobile network to the start-of-the-art research in this area. This course will start by giving some important standards and task forces that are used to refer to different types of wireless and mobile networks such as IEEE 802.11a, IEEE 802.15 etc. Important terminologies and phenomena in the area of mobile networks will be given and will be explained in details. Then the evolution of mobile networks will be explained in details starting from the first generation mobile networks through the 2G, 3G, 4G, and ending with 5G which has not been deployed yet, as of this writing.

Information regarding TDM, FDM, TDM+FDM, CDMA will be explained. Other needed information on signals such as SNR, signal representation etc. will be explained so that the students can better understand the used terms and concepts of work. 3G mobile networks which most of us currently used, in addition to its counterpart in some operators in US CDMA, will be fully described. Afterwards, recent mobile technologies such as 4G and 5G will be explained so that students will have up-to-date information about how our mobile networks will look like in the future.

ETE100 Fundamentals of Electrical Circuits

Electrical Circuits course is the first exposure students may have to Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering. Electrical Circuits course is designed to enhance\gain many important skills that engineering student\graduate needs. As an introduction of the course, basic concepts will be given at the beginning of the course that includes the following topics; current, charge, voltage, system of units. Then we will move forward into introducing fundamental laws that are used to determine the values of the above-mentioned variables; current, power, and voltage such as Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s law that govern electric circuits and considered a foundation upon which electric circuit analysis is built. The two most powerful techniques for circuit analysis; nodal analysis and mesh analysis will be taught afterwards accompanied with examples and practice problems. It is important that the student fully understands Ohm’s law and Kirchhoff’s law in order to be well-prepared for applying nodal and mesh analysis techniques. Nodal analysis is based on Kirchhoff’s current law while mesh analysis is based on Kirchhoff’s voltage law.

Then we will move on to describe the different techniques used to analyze electric circuits such as Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems. The difference between those theorems and nodal and mesh analysis is that they simplify the electric circuit by changing its configuration while the former techniques conduct the analysis without tampering with the original configuration.

In addition to resistors, additional linear circuit elements will be given during the course of giving this subject. Two passive linear circuit elements which are namely, the capacitor and the inductor will be taught. The main difference between those two new elements and the resistors is that unlike resistors, which dissipate energy, capacitors and inductors do not dissipate but store energy. Circuits with a combination of all the above-mentioned elements will be taught to students, for example; circuits with resistors and capacitors or circuits with resistors and inductors, these kinds of circuits are called RC and RL circuits respectively. Prerequisites for this course are physics and calculus.

2. Department of Architectural Engineering:

DES204 Basic Design Studio I

Basic Design Studio I Introduces students to the basics of design and how to express ideas in coherent ways to communicate fundamentals of design, particularly in architecture. Learn design elements and principles of application. In addition, elements including line, value, color, texture, shape, size and direction are analyzed in both theatrical and practical aspects. Principles including unity, conflict, dominance, repetition, harmony, balance, and gradation are applied in projects to integrate theories into design solutions. Students are also introduced to visual elements such as points and line, shape and mass, texture, light, color, and space. Students are expected to apply concepts learned from research and course lectures to create 2D and 3D compositions. Assigned projects in a variety of media have been selected to develop technical skills, sensitivity, and perception in order to communicate effective artistic intent and vision. This course is the introductory studio course for the students in the Architectural Engineering Program.

ARC211 Architectural Drawing II (Prerequisite for this course is ARC200)

The course has been formulated to explain the advanced techniques of architectural drawing to students. Fundamentally, it has been designed to learn AutoCAD software parallel with conventional drawing techniques. Students through the course will explore standard techniques of converting the complicated architectural forms to plans, sections, elevations and isometrics while obtaining the required drafting/drawing skills. This course develops and refines student skills acquired in Drawing I, including freehand pencil rendering, concepts of light and shadow, technical 1 and 2 point perspective drawing and a thorough introduction to AutoCAD.

ARC 310 Architectural Analysis I: Buildings and Drawings (Prerequisite for this course is ARC302)

Analysis of remarkable buildings and works of individual architects through an exploration of drawings and built form, historical and contemporary using field trips, videos, photography, discussion, and documentation. Evaluation of design significance through comparative research and writing. The goal of this course is to investigate with students’ backgrounds on some of the pivotal events that have shaped our understanding and approach to architecture. Emphasis of discussion will be primarily on buildings and works of individual architects. Students will study the works of recognized architects through history, buildings and movements that have exerted significant influences on the development of architecture. As a final project, each student will analyze a building through drawings, text, bibliography and a physical model in a format ready for documentation and exhibition.

ARC100 Freehand Architectural Drawing

This studio course aims to enhance visualization abilities towards effective 2D and 3D freehand graphic representation and design communication and includes in-class drawing exercises, lectures/videos/demonstrations, and out-of-class assignments. A sketchbook is required and to be submitted at the end of the semester. Various freehand drawing styles, mediums and techniques will be explored. While dependence on digital drawing is increasing in the architectural design field, freehand drawing and sketching remain critical to creative conceptual design thinking and communication.

ARC200 Architecture Drawing I

This course introduces students to the basic fundamentals of drafting: examines the use of drafting equipment, multi-view drawing techniques, simple architectural construction and its pictorial representation, and notation. The course includes drafting fundamentals, lettering, geometric construction, orthographic projection, isometric drawing, dimensioning, and sectional views.

ARC201 Architecture: Culture, Community & Climate (Prerequisite for this course is GED104)

This course satisfies the three credit hours of Specialization requirement. The course includes an introduction to architecture as a cultural form and as a fulfilment of the needs of the community. This introduction includes practical exercises and texts of selective topics from books, architecture periodicals and Internet publications. The course covers the subjects of culture, culture forms, subcultures, and architecture as a cultural form, Kurdish culture, community, community types and phases, sense of community index, climatic influence, and settlements. By the end of the course, the student will be able to understand that architecture is a permanent manifestation of culture and the fulfilment of community needs.

ARC202 Architecture Design I – Space Design (Prerequisites for this course are DES204 and ARC100)

This studio course builds on Basic Design and satisfies the three credit hour specialization requirement. The course includes elementary architectural design, practical exercises, and texts from selective topics from books, architecture periodicals, and Internet publications.

The texts are designed to develop students’ ability to deal with fundamental architectural design principles, and increase their basic knowledge and understanding of design in architectural engineering. Topics also include primary elements, forms and shapes in architecture, basic rules of ordering, grouping and composition, basic rules of harmony, scale and transformation of forms. Towards the end of the course, students are given a design exercise that is less abstract and more realistic involving space planning, programmation, functional relationships/bubble diagrams, circulation and building construction.

ARC210 Architecture Design II – CAD (Prerequisite for this course is ARC202)

The course includes an introduction to function in architecture by focusing on functional relationships in a simple domestic project (house), teaching students how to fulfill space requirements which are to be reflected in a final design on a specific site. The student will be introduced to basic construction and simple structural principles (load bearing walls and skeleton systems), in addition to information regarding international architectural standards (e.g. Neufert’s Architectural Standard). The student will be required to understand domestic form by studying similar examples/precedents, working on the design process in studio class and at home, considering design as a problem-solving process. Drawings will be rendered both by hand and digitally.

ARC300 Environmental Systems: Site and Sustainability

(Prerequisite for this course is GED110)

This course examines the relationships between building, site, landscape and sustainability through the lens of ecology and systems thinking. Topics include: basic concepts of sustainability, energetic processes, climate, spatial data visualization, global warming/climate destabilization, solar geometry, landscape design processes, microclimates, site strategies and grading, Sustainable indoor environments, building footprint, and sustainable building metrics.

ARC301 History of Architecture I (Prerequisite for this course is ARC201)

This course satisfies the 3 credit hours of specialization requirement and meets specific requirements for programs as outlined in the AUK Undergraduate Catalog. The course includes introduction to Ancient History of Architecture, concentrating on prehistoric architecture in addition to main Mesopotamia, Egypt, Greek and Roman architecture, allowing students to understand how culture impacts and informs architecture and how to read historical architectural forms in terms of cultural values. This introduction includes practical exercises and selected texts from books, architecture periodicals and internet publications. The texts are designed to develop student appreciation of the history of architecture as precedent for future development. By the end of the course, the student will be able to understand that architecture is one of the most permanent manifestations/reflections of history.

ARC302 Building Technology: Materials and Methods (Prerequisite for this course is DES204)

This course has been formulated to introduce students to the most common utilized materials in the construction of buildings and explain their properties, ingredients and classifications. Fundamental principles of structural, physical and long-term performance are also explained and discussed. Additionally, the course provides basic information about main building elements, their type and functions as well as an overview of various construction systems.

ARC303 Architecture Design III – 3D Design (Prerequisite for this course is ARC210)

This studio course satisfies the 3 credit hours of Specialization requirement, and is a continuation of ARCH 203 with an emphasis on the synthesis of basic form determinants of sustainable, medium-sized, mixed-use, multi-story public buildings (in this case a museum, gift-book-convenience shop, gallery/visitors’ center, café-restaurant, curatorial offices, and labs and workshops for AUK. Students will demonstrate competence in basic architectural design and digital drafting, and preparedness for the third-year focus on materials and methods of building construction. Students are required to bring a laptop computer to this class and work in studio.

ARC312 Structural Systems and Analysis (Prerequisite for this course is MEG201)

This course introduces analyzing structural elements subjected to transverse and/or axial loads. It builds on prior knowledge of mechanics of materials. This course provides foundation knowledge, skills and their application which are relevant to subsequent courses in design of steel and concrete structures. Topics include Classification of Structural Systems, Loads, Truss Analysis, Shear and Moment Diagrams, Deflection of Beams, Analysis of Indeterminate Structures.

ARC313 Architecture Design IV – Lighting Design and Analysis (Prerequisite for this course is ARC303)

This studio course builds on previous architectural design studio courses and related engineering, environmental, and drafting coursework. The student is introduced to lighting design through lectures, studio projects including exterior and interior lighting systems, and student PPT presentations/research. Final project renderings are to be produced digitally and include detailed lighting systems and models. Day and night, shade and shadow, comfortable levels of office/residential/commercial lighting, laser light shows, ornamental lighting, natural lighting, new and sustainable lighting technologies, impact of climate and seasons on lighting, light as medium.

ARC314 History of Architecture II

Prerequisite for ARC301

This course satisfies the 3 credit hour specialization requirement and meets specific requirements for programs as outlined in the AUK Undergraduate Catalog.  The course continues from History of Architecture I and covers a broad chronological spectrum up to and including international contemporary architecture allowing students to understand how culture impacts and informs architecture and how to read historical architectural forms in terms of cultural values. This introduction includes practical exercises and selected texts from books, architecture periodicals and internet publications. The texts are designed to develop student appreciation of the history of architecture as precedent for current and future development.

ARC314 History of Architecture II (Prerequisite for this course is ARC301)

This course satisfies the 3 credit hour specialization requirement and meets specific requirements for programs as outlined in the AUK Undergraduate Catalog. The course continues from History of Architecture I and covers a broad chronological spectrum up to and including international contemporary architecture allowing students to understand how culture impacts and informs architecture and how to read historical architectural forms in terms of cultural values. This introduction includes practical exercises and selected texts from books, architecture periodicals and internet publications. The texts are designed to develop student appreciation of the history of architecture as precedent for current and future development.

ARC401 Architectural Analysis II: Architecture, City, and Landscape (Prerequisite for this course is ARC310)

This course builds on and continues from Architectural Analysis I with a broader purview including architecture, urbanism, and landscape design. Analysis through an exploration of drawings, aerial photography, videos and built form. Comparative historical and contemporary urban patterns, city planning, field trips, discussion, documentation and classic texts. Evaluation through research, student PPT presentations and writing. Architecture within and around the city, suburbia, urban and landscape theories/designs, and an interdisciplinary study of mixed-media representations of the city, garden and urban landscape.

ARC402 Architectural Technology (Prerequisite for this course is ARC310)

This course examines building construction from the perspectives of health and life safety (including zoning, fire regulations and international building codes), security, building service systems (HVAC, plumbing, electrical, heating, air conditioning, ventilation, vertical circulation, fire protection), sustainability, materials, structural components, life-cycle analysis, accessibility, technical documentation and outline specifications, POE (post-operative evaluation)

ENG400 Technical Writing (Prerequisite for this course is PHY100)

This course involves technical report writing and terminologies used in the profession and aims to provide the student with skills in information assimilation and compilation–such as technical documents including specifications, regulations and reports. Focus includes academic research writing and architectural writing such as journal papers and academic publications. Students are encouraged to communicate their findings in writing as well as graphically.

ARC403 Architecture Design V (Prerequisite for this course is ARC313)

This studio builds on and integrates previous studios and coursework and involves the design of complex architectural projects situated in challenging urban contexts (e.g. former war zones), developed with regard to program, climate, culture, site, building, and representation. In addition to the usual deliverables, the final project requires a digital animation and public participation with a focus on sustainability and equity.

ARC410 Design of Structural Elements I: Concrete (Prerequisite for this course is ARC312)

This class will introduce the students to the fundamentals of reinforced concrete design in accordance with ACI 318 Code. Topics include Flexural analysis and design of reinforced concrete beams for rectangular beams and T-beams, shear and diagonal tension, serviceability, bond, anchorage and development length, short and slender columns, slabs, footings, and retaining walls, including computer applications.

ARC411 Green Buildings

(Prerequisite for this course is ARC310)

This course covers the principles behind green buildings—their environmental impacts, green technologies, standards and benchmarks, goals, strategies, and sustainability. Examples will be studied and analyzed where buildings have reduced environmental impacts in terms of energy, water, waste, transportation, and the indoor environment. Principles learned are to be applied to and demonstrated in the Studio VI projects.

ARC412 Architecture Design VI – Architecture Sustainability (Prerequisite for this course is ARC403)

This studio focuses on sustainability and builds on and integrates previous studios and current coursework (Green Buildings). It also involves the design of complex architectural projects situated in challenging contexts and developed with regard to program, climate, culture, site, building, and representation. In addition to the usual deliverables, the final project requires a digital animation and public participation with a focus on sustainability, environmental impact and equity.

ARC420 Architecture Design VII – Urban Design (Prerequisite for this course is ARC412)

This studio course, while building on and integrating previous studios and coursework, will explore the fundamentals of urban design in relation to the built environment – focusing on a local “live project” of urban design initiative, such as the integration of a refugee or IDP camp into its larger urban context, or the adaptive re-invention of a demolished city block.

ARC 421 Design of Structural Elements II: Steel (Prerequisite for this course is ARC312)

This course covers concepts of structural steel design and introduces the behavior and design of steel structure members using LRFD method in accordance with AISC Steel Construction Manual. Topics include the design of tension and compression members, beams, beam-columns, simple and eccentric connections, composite construction, and plate girders, including computer applications.

ARC500 Architectural Design VIII – Thesis (Prerequisite: for this course is ARC420)

Advanced studio work in architectural design, with thesis options to be chosen from (but not limited to) urban design, ecology/sustainability, architectural technology, computational design, affordable housing, culture, reconstruction and planning, and representation.

ARC501 Internship for Architectural Engineers

This opportunity to work at an architectural engineering, architecture or engineering firm for the semester in conjunction with coursework will be set up and overseen by the Department. A final student report will be required. International opportunities may be considered for summer term.

ARC311 Landscape Design (Prerequisite for this course is ARC303)

This introductory course involves lectures, reading and problem-solving studio exercises to give an overview of historical, cultural and technical aspects of the art and science of planning/designing on the land, arranging and creating spaces and objects to complement built form. The course will also explore how site, climate, environment and legislation affect the design process. Topography, grading and surveying techniques, and plant identification and characteristics will be considered, along with hardscape, softscape, vegetal landscaping and vertical farming.

3. Department of Petroleum Engineering:

CEG 205 Fluid Mechanics (Prerequisites for this course are MEG201 and MAT160)

This course is worth 3 credit hours for the specialization requirement. This course covers important topics in fluid mechanics. It will first cover basic concepts in mechanics and fluid mechanics and then it shifts to solving particular problems in fluid mechanics in which the principle concepts of these problems are based on the Fluid Statistics, Fluid Kinematics and Fluid Dynamics Principles. It also involves mathematical applications of these principles for the analysis of simple petroleum engineering problems (we will use skills from other fields to ease problem‐solving). Ultimately, some experimental lab works will be presented at the end of each topic to broaden the student’s knowledge in the considering subject.

PEG301 Numerical Methods (Prerequisite for this course is MAT210)

This course is worth 3 credit hours toward the Specialization requirement. In general, the numerical method is an applied mathematics technique that allows a staggeringly large amount of data to be processed and analyzed for trends, thereby aiding in forming conclusions. This course attempts to give a broad background to numerical methods common to Petroleum Engineering. It begins with core concepts of error estimate and accuracy of numerical solutions. It then introduces the student to methods of solution of linear and nonlinear equations. Both direct and iterative solution methods are discussed. Next we introduce the numerical solution of partial differential equations, after a brief review of canonical partial differential equations and well known analytical techniques for their solution, stressing when and why numerical solutions are necessary. The concepts polynomial interpolation using Lagrange polynomials and numerical quadrature is introduced. Numerical integration is discussed, emphasizing the key requirements of stability and accuracy of integration algorithms. Ultimately, we discuss integral equations and introduce numerical techniques for their solution. Also the MATLAB software will be used which allows rapid prototyping and testing of the numerical methods.

MAT120 Calculus I – Differential and Integral

This course deals with fundamental concepts of differential calculus. Topics include limits and continuity for single variable functions. Rates of change, derivatives, related rates, basic differentiation rules, integrals and applications of integrals including volumes, arc lengths, and surface areas. The aim of this course is to develop practical skills in differential and integral calculus as well as practical applications.

MAT160 Calculus II – Series and Parametric Equations

This course is a continuation of Calculus 1. It includes methods of application of integrals, derivatives and integrals of exponential and logarithmic functions, applications, sequences and series, power, Taylor and Maclaurin Series, and polar coordinate.

PEG210 Geology of Petroleum in Kurdistan (Prerequisite for this course is PEG200)

During the last few decades, little attention has been focused on the geology of Iraq generally and Kurdistan in particular. Recently, increased interest has been generated by the Kurdistan Regional Government and many oil companies. One important issue that needs to be dealt with is the study of geology of the rock units in the Kurdistan Region, particularly petroleum geology. Geologically, the Kurdistan Region represents the extreme northeastern part of the Arabian Plate along the Zagros-Taurus Orogenic Belt.

Petroleum geology of Kurdistan is the study of the origin, occurrence, movement, accumulation, and exploration of hydrocarbons in the region. It deals with a specific set of geological disciplines that are applied to the search for hydrocarbons (oil exploration). Generally, oil and gas accumulate against the seal, to the depth of the base of the seal. Any further hydrocarbon migrating in from the source will escape to the surface and seep.

This course tries to show the history of the varied rock units in Kurdistan in hopes of understanding in greater detail where oil comes from and where more oil might be found, as well as the best ways to retrieve oil and utilize it once it has been retrieved. It is the application of geology (the study of rocks) to the exploration for, and production of, oil and gas.